Camp NaNoWriMo 2019 – How’d It Go?

Um, TERRIBLE.

As I mentioned in my last blog post, I was hit by a nasty flu that literally kept me in my bed and dead for over a week. However, I did get some stuff done as evident by the one or two Camp NaNoWriMo updates I wrote before falling off the wagon. Anyways, I hope for any of you who participated, it went well and you are happy with all your new words! If you didn’t reach your goals, don’t worry, I understand. But there’s always July, the next Camp NaNo session!

Okay, so during April, I wrote a total of 13, 486 words out of my goal of 20,000 which I bumped up mid-month to 25,000…ha, ha, ha. This Camp NaNo was a little different than usual for me because I wasn’t writing for one project, I was doing a few projects because of scholarship essays and whatnot. So, already, I was a little scatter brain because I was jumping from one project to the next and to the next. However, I did get all the essays I needed to get done, I just didn’t end up working on my last goal which was my Project Mystic story. But whatever, I’ll get a move on that this month.

How did I end up failing so miserably?

Well, I could blame it on being sick, but honestly, halfway through the month, I started getting busy. I had friends come and visit me for an entire weekend, I also had family come visit too, and I also had a lot of big assignments for school swamp my vision from writing. However, I do know I could have found some writing time in there. I was definitely losing speed during the end of week 2, and then week 3 was mostly editing everything I wrote, and then the last week was when I was wiped out from the flu. After that, I never regained my writing routine again and honestly, I am STILL struggling. I think this weekend I’ve written about 3,000 words which is great after a week of absolutely nothing, but I need to get back into a routine of writing every day. I love writing every day because then I am not chased by the guilt of not writing, and also, writing every day is something I find easy enough to do if I try. I have NOT been trying lately though so starting today, I am going to wake up early(ish) and get some writing done before school. My goal is only 500 words because I don’t want to expect too much too soon, but hopefully, I will get a bit more than that.

Here are some of my tips for getting back into a writing routine:

  • Figure Out What Time You Write – Tailor your writing time to when you are most creative. For me, this used to be in the evenings but over the years, I’ve realized I have switched to being a morning person. This means I need to wake up a little earlier than usual if I want to get some writing done, but it’s worth it because most of the time, the words flow out nicely.
  • Start Small, End Big – By this, I mean start with small, manageable daily goals and then slowly increase them. For example, aim to write 500 words for one or two days, then raise it to 750 words and do that for one or two days, then to 1000 words and so on. It helps you work back up to whatever you used to do without overwhelming yourself.
  • Plan Out Your Writing Sessions – Sometimes for me, figuring out what I am going to write after NOT writing for a while is really overwhelming. This is when I find planning out my writing sessions helpful. I will look at where I left off in a project or what I need to work on and then write out my next plan of attack. That way, I know exactly what to do when I sit down to write.

While April seems like a flop when you look at my target word count compared to my actual word count, it really wasn’t! I did get everything I NEEDED to get done and that’s good enough for me. I always talk about how life happens, and sometimes we physically and mentally cannot write, and that’s okay. And it is! So, here is your daily reminder that it is okay to flop sometimes because we all need it at some point.

Anyways, thanks for reading this blog post and I hope you enjoyed! Let me know if you participated in Camp NaNoWriMo this year, and how that went, and also if you are participating in the next session as well in July because I’d love to know. Also, don’t forget to check out my last blog post as well as my social media accounts linked down below! Thanks for reading 🙂

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How To: Stay Sane This Camp NaNoWriMo

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Happy Thursday!

Today I am going to be talking all about tips and tricks to stay sane this Camp NaNoWriMo to ensure you have a productive and great April. I hope that you are all well on your way to your goals, and if not, that’s okay! Here are some tips to not lose your mind whether you are working yourself to the bone or grinding your teeth trying to catch up.

  • Take a Break – I had to get the obvious one out of the way, but honestly, just take a break! Have a hot bath and read, take a walk, read, bake, or draw. Just take a break from writing and let your mind settle. Sometimes we think we are fine and don’t need a break, but trust me, we do. If not, we will just burn out in a few days or so of keeping up a crazy pace. For example, right after I write this blog post, I am going to be taking a nice, long, hot bath and dive deeper into Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake.
  • Make a Writing Plan for the Next Day – This really helps me feel like I have a handle on my life. Sometimes planning the whole month or week in advance can be intimidating and completely overwhelming so I recommend finishing the day, seeing what you get done, and then planning what you think is possible for you to get done the next day. For example, I wrote around 700ish words today so I am going to aim to write around the same tomorrow because one, that is a plan I know I can achieve, and two, it is not too overwhelming a word count.
  • Organize Your Writing Area – Sometimes when our space is cluttered and chaotic, our minds are too. Take a minute or two to clean off your desk or kitchen table, or wherever you write. Put those dirty coffee cups into the dishwasher, place those pens back into your desk, and stack your loose papers into a neat pile. Once you finish cleaning it all off, sit down and just breathe.
  • Stretch Every Twenty Or So Minutes – It is day 11 of Camp NaNoWriMo and already my neck, shoulders, and back are KILLING me. I try to stretch my neck and legs out every so often because otherwise, I wake up the next day feeling like I’ve run ten kilometers. Make sure you are keeping yourself healthy both mentally and physically!
  • Switch Up Your Writing Location Often – Since the fresh energy of week one is over and we are working through week two, I really recommend switching up your writing place as to not let your creativity stale. Move to the kitchen table or living room or a coffee shop near your house or even outside. Just change it up and keep your creativity flowing.

That is all for this blog post, and I hope you found it helpful! Don’t forget to check out my last blog post, as well as my social media accounts linked down below. Good luck if you’re participating in Camp NaNoWriMo, and remember to keep going! Thanks for reading 🙂

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Why It’s OK to Feel Weird About Calling Yourself a Writer

Happy Monday!

Today, I wanted to talk about something that affects ALL writers, and that is the daunting task of actually calling ourselves a “writer”. Before I get into that though, I did want to do a little announcement that I have recently added a review policy to my blog! Lately, people have been reaching out to me to review their book or their client’s book, so I decided it was time to post my review policy for all to see. You can find it, if you are interested, on the top right corner of my blog along with my “About Me” and “My Writing” pages or right HERE.

Anyways, onto the actual blog post:

A common tip that writers tell other writers to succeed in writing is to actually call yourself a writer. Tell it to your friends, shout it to the sky, or add it to your Instagram bio. The point of it is to gain the confidence you should have in that title because if you are writing ANYTHING, you are a writer!

However, it can be a difficult task for some of us. The title is too heavy to bear on our shoulders and too flashy to wear in front of others without worrying about how it makes you look. One of the most crucial steps of being a writer though is finally being able to call yourself a writer. I agree with this, but I also think it is okay to take time in claiming that title. It is a lot. Especially if you have a life torrenting with other aspects that you are having trouble capturing.

It’s okay to swallow the word one letter at a time.

The last thing you want is to rush into it head on, only to look up and see the towering mountains above and the never-ending expanse of blue sky and think wow, I am so small. You aren’t, but it feels that way sometimes.

Here are some actionable, small steps to help you get closer to calling yourself a writer, but also to not make it a scary, winding road:

  • Keep Writing – Focus on your craft. Get better. Continue loving the art of storytelling.
  • Attend Writing Events – They don’t need to be workshops because you should definitely feel confident calling yourself a writer first, but readings are fun to go to. You can listen to other writers read their work and by listening to them, you can gain inspiration and admiration off of their courage!
  • Join the Online Writing Community – Whether you want to join the writing community through blogging, being active on Twitter, Instagram or FaceBook, or all the above, either one is an effective way to get more comfortable with the idea of calling yourself a writer. Being a part of a community with people who have gone through the same challenges as you will help you immensely!

Take your time. The world will wait.

That is all for this blog post, and I hope you enjoyed! Don’t forget to check out my last blog post, as well as my social media accounts linked down below. Thanks for reading 🙂

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Camp NaNoWriMo Prep – Last Minute Writing Checklist

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I haven’t done many (or any, I can’t remember) Camp NaNoWriMo prep posts, and since it is the LAST Monday of the month before we are in April (aka Camp NaNoWriMo, I thought it would be good to squeeze at least one in. Today, I decided to put together a checklist of all the things you should get done this week before Camp NaNoWriMo. I know I’ve fallen a little behind on my prep, so I will 100% be going through this list to make sure I am ready to go for the month of April. Anyways, I hope you enjoy and find it helpful!

  • Join a cabin – Cabin assignments were made yesterday so I would hop onto joining a cabin ASAP. Cabins are a great way to meet other writers and motivate each other to keep writing during this busy and slightly stressful month. Sometimes cabin experiences are better than others, but overall, my cabin experience has always been fantastic! You can turn to your cabinmates for advice and a lot of them are pretty experienced and eager to help out.
  • Gather Up All Your Writing Inspiration – By this, I mean make a playlist of all the writing vlogs that inspire you on YouTube, pick out a few books that make you want to write, or create the perfect playlist that forces your butt into your writing chair. Whatever gets you motivated, gather that all up and make it accessible to you for April!
  • Fuel Your Creative Well – This is so important as we approach April because you do not want to start Camp NaNoWriMo with your creative well dried up and depleted of ideas. This means you should be reading as much as you can in this last week, as well as watching all the good movies and TV shows! Take a break from writing and planning too, and you will start Camp NaNoWriMo feeling refreshed and ready to write.
  • Take a Break from Your Outline – If you are starting a new project or new projects like me, then you have probably been working on your outline(s) for a while. This is your last chance to take a step back from them before April starts, so I recommend letting them sit for a few days and then a day or two before Camp NaNoWriMo actually starts, look them over again and see if you want to change anything. Not only will this give you a breather from your work, but you also might return to your outline and realize something needs to be changed.
  • Clean Up Your Writing Space – Wherever you are writing, make sure it is cleared off and clean so you aren’t wasting writing time during April to “just tidy up a bit”. I do this all the time, and while I do get down business afterward, I am wasting precious writing time by doing this “little” clean up. Get it done now!

There is my checklist for Camp NaNoWriMo, and I hope some of you found it helpful! Let me know if you are participating this year in camp because I would love to know! Also, don’t forget to check out my last blog post as well as my social media accounts linked down below for more writing and reading related content. Thanks for reading 🙂

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Using Philosophy To Become a Better Writer

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After an existentialism unit in my English class, I have had a sudden interest in learning about philosophy and what exactly that means. And it is a lot, let me tell you. Philosophy consists of so, so, so many schools of thoughts that it is really hard to keep track, and honestly, maybe impossible to learn them all in depth. Unless this is what you choose to devote your life to, but even then, there is a lot to learn. Anyways, I’m by no means an expert or even an intermediate honestly, but I want to share with you all how I use what I’ve learned about philosophy to become a better, stronger writer. I hope you enjoy!

What IS Philosophy Exactly?

A Wikipedia definition says that philosophy is the study of general and fundamental problems concerning matters such as existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language. It involves thinking, discussion, rational argument, and questioning. Philosophy is basically the study of human life; how we think, act, etc, and why we do all that.

What Are Philosophical Schools of Thought?

A school of thought is a way of thinking, and in philosophy, there are a lot because humans cannot agree on just one way of thinking, let alone 10 or even 50. I’m only going to list 5 so you can get an idea of what I mean by “philosophical schools of thought”, but in this blog post, I’m probably only going to mention 3 or so later on.

  • Existentialism – A school of thought that emphasizes personal freedom
  • Nihilism – A school of thought that rejects religious and moral principles
  • Marxism – A school of thought based on the political and economic theories of Karl Marx, later associates itself with communism
  • Taoism – A school of thought that emphasizes living in harmony with the Tao, which means way or path
  • Stoicism – A school of thought that accepts the ways of the world whether they are positive or negative

How Can Philosophy Make Your Writing Better?

Having your story or one of your characters aligned with a philosophical school of thought, or just being aware of philosophy can increase the depth and physicality of your writing. Just because your incorporating philosophy doesn’t mean your story can’t still be a YA contemporary or even a fantasy, it just means you are increasing the quality of your story, character, and world.

Examples:

  • One of your characters is an existentialist. This allows you to explore how they interact with society, how society interacts with them, and how their beliefs affect the plot
  • The society of your world is a nihilistic society. First off, this would be terrifying but SO interesting to read about because how do the people who don’t believe in this school of thought live? How do people who disagree with nihilism keep their morality? How do those who follow nihilism live?
  • What would it look like to follow a character who enjoys studying philosophy? Does this allow them to make better decisions?

I know this was short, but I really wanted this to just plant the idea of exploring philosophy in your writing. It really does make for interesting stories and characters because we don’t see philosophy explored too often in modern literature, especially YA! Here are some resources to learn about philosophy:

Crash Course: Philosophy – This is put on by two authors, Hank, and John Green and they were SUPER helpful in teaching the basics of philosophy and other areas of it. I definitely recommend checking out this playlist, or at least a few of the videos on it to see if philosophy interests you.

The Outsider by Albert Camus – This is a novel that focuses on an existentialism character named Meursault, who after committing an immoral crime and fails to feel remorse for it, is cast as an outsider by society. It is a really interesting character study, and I learned so much about writing and writing characters from it.

That is it for this blog post, but I hope it was useful and eye-opening for you! Don’t forget to check out my last blog post, as well as my social media accounts which are all linked down below. Thanks for reading 🙂

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Piecing Together THE Idea – Tips, Tricks & Steps

 

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Happy Wednesday!

If you read my last blog post, I talked about how I was re-defining my blog regarding the content I post (still books, writing, and whatnot, just more creative!), buuut this blog post is not part of that. Of course, I put a lot of effort into this blog post as I always do, but my new, vamped up content is in progress and yet to come. Get excited though because I am! Anyways, today I will be sharing some tips and all that fun stuff on getting a story idea and what to do next. I hope this is helpful!

Getting the Idea:

TIP #1: Focus On the Bare Bones of the Idea Rather Than the Big Picture – Thinking of the beginning, middle, and end before you even a concept of an idea can not only be intimidating but hinder your ability to flesh out an interesting and fleshed out story. Instead, focus on a simple, few word outline of an idea and slowly build off of that. Example: A bus ride; what happens on the bus ride?; who is on the bus ride?; where is the bus going?

The Next Steps:

  • Build Off That Idea Via Point Form – This makes it easier to organize, think of, keep track of, and continue building off of all your thoughts and ideas
  • Determine the Theme – This is helpful when determining how you want your story to sound tone wise as well. It may not seem very important at first, but if you know what you want your story to sound like, writing it will be so much easier! What do I mean by sound? Well, that refers to if your story is more upbeat, dark, powerful, etc, etc
  • Give Your Character Depth By Giving Them One Unique Quality – Of course, you should develop your main character a lot more than giving them just ONE interesting quality, but when it comes to the early stages of writing a story, this makes it SO much easier to write your story. I am a firm believer in planning the basic outline of your story, writing the first draft to see what works and whatnot, AND THEN going back to fully outline everything.
  • Focus On One Part At a Time: Beginning, Middle, and then the End – Come Up With At Least 3 Plot Points for Beginning, Middle + End – These will act as almost connecting tissue for the bones of your idea (whatever is the beginning, middle + end), making your story better.
  • One Liner Ending – Again, the more concise in the beginning stages the better. Come up with your ending and translate it into one single sentence. This will make the writing part easier, trust me! This will also allow you to have more creative freedom when it comes to your ending, how you get there, and what exactly happens because you won’t have a super detailed outline that you need to follow…unless that is how you write best.

Quick Tips:

  1. Point Form – I mentioned this above but I just need to do it again. Point form keeps things quick and simple, making it a lot easier to follow when writing!
  2. Remember A Story Comes in Pieces – All of my steps above are the bits and pieces that you will need to string together in order to write a concise and full story. You need all the parts, maybe even some more. When I write this way, I write faster and more efficiently which is always amazing.
  3. Writing Fills In A Lot of Gaps – Unless you are a hardcore plotter, it is important to remember that writing will fill in a lot of gaps you notice in your outline when in the planning stages. Sometimes, we just can’t come up with a reasonable solution or plot point or answer for our outline, and a lot of the times, just writing the story is the best way to solve it! It results in a more creative and free story that flows all nicely together.

Those are my tips and tricks and steps when it comes to piecing together your story idea, and I hope you enjoyed! Don’t forget to check out my last blog post, as well as my social media accounts which are all linked down below. Thanks for reading 🙂

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How To Write Awesome Characters

Happy Friday!

I hope the New Year is treating you well so far, and to help celebrate it, I am going to be sharing a few of my tips on how to write awesome characters that you and your readers will love. If you have any other tips leave in the comments below and let’s help each other! Anyways, let’s get into it.

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  1. Make Them Passionate About Something – Funnily enough, this tip was reminded to me through reading Wintersong by S. Jae-Jones, a book I didn’t really love. However, I did admire how passionate the main character was about music and composing, and it reminded me that passion for something is a strong ingredient in anyone, even characters. Think about it, when you are making friends, you always ask what kind of things they enjoy doing. When that person is really interested in one, two, or even a few things and beam when they talk about those things, you feel like you understand that person more thus making it easier to become friends. It is the same with characters, if you make them intensely passionate about at least one thing, there is a chance that some of your readers have the same passion but if they don’t, at least you readers will admire reading about a character who despite the plot, is passionate about something they love. Make sense? Passion adds depth and depth creates awesome characters.
  2. Ensure They Are Neither Truly Good or Bad – One thing I hate reading about is an entirely good main character because it’s not realistic! None of us are perfect. We can be mostly good but we will still make bad decisions. To combat this problem, create a realistic and interesting character by addressing that they aren’t always good or bad through their actions. It is the same with pure evil characters. Sure, if they are the antagonist I don’t mind having one that is like 99.9% evil. However, it is even BETTER when they aren’t purely evil but have some good mixed in there. It makes the villain so much more than just the villain, thus creating an awesome character.
  3. Focus On Their Interactions – I have read so many books where our main character is speaking to their best friend or sibling or boyfriend/girlfriend, but it sounds SO formal. This always throws me out of the story a bit because suddenly, my ability to believe this story as reality fades. It is so important to focus on first, who your character is and from then, go onto how they interact with those around them. Figure out how they would speak to their parents, best friend, brother, sister, grandparents, friends, strangers, villains, etc, etc. It will bring your characters and story to life.
  4. Watch Avatar: The Last Airbender – This TV show is AMAZING when it comes to sharing character backstory, personality, motives, etc…basically anything about the character is revealed in genius ways throughout the 3 seasons of this TV show. Honestly, watch it for fun because this is one of my favourite shows ever, but also analyze how the creators make awesome characters. Watch how they develop each individual storyline and make it fit seamlessly together with other characters…just watch it. Now.

Those are my 4 main tips to creating awesome characters and I hope that this was helpful to you, especially in the new year when new stories are being created and old ones are being revised. Double check your characters tick of these boxes and you are one step closer to great, 3D characters. Anyways, don’t forget to check out my last blog post, as well as my social media accounts which are linked down below. Thanks for reading 🙂

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How To: Take a Break From Writing

I really wanted to make this blog post on how to take a PROPER and BENEFICIAL break from writing because I actually plan on taking a whole month off of writing. I will explain this a bit more at the end of this post because first I am going to be sharing some tips and tricks to get the most out of a writing break!

Q: Should I Take a Writing Break?

I think it is essential to take a writing break from time to time. Whether that is only a week or a month, taking some time to just chill and rejuvenate your creativity is crucial to your writing as well as your mental and physical well-being. So yes, if you feel yourself on the verge of breaking from the stress of writing, or if you are well past that point, keep reading this because it is time to take a break! Breaks from writing will also give you a chance to focus your time and energy on other things like reading, school work, exercise, or spending time with friends or family. Things that you might have been neglecting before.

Q: Will Taking a Writing Break Make Me a Bad Writer?

No! Taking time away from writing can sometimes install guilt because we writers have this idea that we need to always be writing, and if we don’t, we are a failure. This is not true and here is your daily reminder of it! Taking time will if anything, only make you a BETTER writer. Breaks are important because they prevent burnout which is really unhealthy so take that break.

How To Get the Most Out of Your Break:

  • Read…a LOT – This is a great way to fill your depleted creative well with good stories, that way, you will be topped off and ready to write when your break is over. Some books I recommend reading during your break are Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert, Eat Pray Love by Elizabeth Gilbert, and On Writing by Stephen King.
  • Watch movies/TV Shows…a LOT – This is like reading, this refuels you with good stories and also gives your mind a break from thinking, creating, etc. Something that everyone needs.
  • Pick Up a New Hobby – One way to help your creativity/writing is to try something new and totally unrelated to writing. Start baking or knitting or exercising. Something that will keep you occupied from the guilt of not writing and that you really enjoy.
  • Focus Your Energy On Neglected Activities – Whether it is time to make more time for your friends and family, or spend more time outside, focus this new found time and energy into things you might have been neglecting lately.
  • Journal – This is still writing, but this is a type of writing that doesn’t require any outlining or thought really. Journalling is a great way to just let go of everything bottled up inside of you and I recommend it even when you’re not on a writing break.
  • Sleep More – Sometimes I go late into the night writing, but while I’m on writing breaks I try to make it a priority to go to sleep earlier and then wake up early. It’s important to get no less than 7 hours of sleep, but maybe without writing, you can clock in 8 or 9 hours. Personally, sleeping more than 8 hours gives me a headache because my body feels like it has overslept, but it’s nice to be able to wake up early and just lay in bed for longer.

Why I’m Taking a Writing Break…

I wanted to write this blog post because yes, I have decided to go on a writing break. Not only do I feel depleted creatively, but I really want to spend more time focused on reading and school work. I am in my senior year of high school and am also taking a university class (Writing 100), and lately, have felt like I’ve been neglecting school which isn’t good! I want to focus my energy on my school work to end my high school career on a strong note. Of course, I also want to do well in my uni course because I do get credits for it and can use it towards what I am studying next year obviously. There is no set timeline for this writing break but I am starting it this week and basically am going with the flow and ending it whenever. However, saying that, I don’t want it to extend any further than the end of January. Of course, I will still have assignments for my writing class to do and essays for classes and scholarships to write, but my break is more geared towards taking a break from my own personal, creative writing. I’ve put a lot into my own writing these last few months and just really, really need a little breather. But yes, this may be a one and a half month break but we will see. I encourage you to also take a break if you are feeling a little stuck or tired because it might be for the best!

Anyways, that is all for this blog post and I hope you enjoyed! Don’t forget to check out my last blog post as well as my social media accounts linked down below. Thanks for reading 🙂

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Writing Creative Non-Fiction 101

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My writing class is on break right now for finals, but we recently began our creative non-fiction unit and while I haven’t read or written a lot of CNF (creative non-fiction), I have found this unit really fun and interesting to learn and write about. We had a CNF assignment due on December 10th and it was a big change from writing fiction, but I had a lot of fun doing it! Anyways, here are some of the tips I’ve learnt from writing CNF and I hope they help you!

First Off…What is Creative Non-Fiction?

Well, creative non-fiction can be an array of different things from essays to articles, research papers and memoir. The key thing within all pieces of creative non-fiction is that they contain a factual narrative.

Types of CNF:

  • Personal essay
  • Memoir]
  • Literary journalism
  • Travel article
  • Research paper
  • etc, etc, etc

How to Write GOOD Creative Non-Fiction:

  1. Get Your Facts Right – Without correct facts, your creative non-fiction will not be creative non-fiction…it will just be fiction. It is especially important when you are doing a research paper or piece of journalism, that the facts you are using are actually true and correct. When it comes to personal essays and memoir, this is also important to keep in mind. However, when it comes to recalling your entire past, you are going to forget minor details and have to tweak something to make YOUR story make sense. As long as it is your story and overall, is correct and true, that is okay but when it comes to research papers, etc, they must, must, must be correct…does that make sense? The next tip elaborates on this.
  2. Make Aware the Limits of Your Memory but Not TOO Aware – It is important to make it clear to your readers that yeah, your memory is not perfect. However, advertising this too much will make them start to question what is true in your story, and what parts of it are you making up because you can’t remember how this specific incident really went, but think it’s “cool to add in”. No one can remember everything and your audience will appreciate you acknowledging this once. If it is acknowledged repeatedly, it also just becomes repetitive, annoying, and honestly, cliche.
  3. Remember, You Are the Character – Okay, so for research papers and some other pieces of CNF, this isn’t the case but for a lot of types, it is. It is crucial to remember that this is not fiction and you are the main character. This means you have to use “I” with great care and stay true to your own thoughts, values, and mannerisms while writing. Don’t get caught up trying to make yourself seem perfect because you aren’t, and creative non-fiction or really any fiction honestly, should not have perfect or near perfect characters. Just remember to be authentically you.

That was a mini crash course in writing creative non-fiction and I hope you enjoyed! Don’t forget to check out my last blog post, as well as my social media accounts linked down below. Thanks for reading 🙂

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Reading + Writing Update!

Happy Sunday!

I’m not going to apologize for once again, for NOT having a blog post go up on Friday because it’s gotten to the point where I’m just like whatever. My Friday blog post was supposed to be all about my theories for Queen of Air and Darkness by Cassandra Clare, but since I am re-reading Lord of Shadows right now, all my theories have upgraded or changed completely. So yeah, I finished Lord of Shadows today so now I have all of my thoughts and theories are ready to go for tomorrow’s blog post and I am so excited! Anyways, here is what I read and wrote this past week.

Earlier this week I finally finished listening to the audiobook for Emerald Green by Kerstin Gier which took me the entire month to get through, but I did it. I’ve read this book a million and one times, but I do really love the audiobooks for this entire trilogy, so I always have a lot of fun re-visiting them. I read them quite a few times this year though so I think I’m going to take a little break so I don’t wear them out. My next audiobook I am going to pick up is City of Lost Souls by Cassandra Clare since I am still working my way through The Mortal Instruments series via audiobook. I also finished reading Lord of Shadows by Cassandra Clare today, as I mentioned already…and I don’t know what else to say except it is amazing, I love it, and re-reading it has only magnified my already dangerously crazy love for it. I am SO excited for Queen of Air and Darkness and am really happy I decided to re-read both Lady Midnight and Lord of Shadows before because I picked up on so many things I didn’t before. Since I am done re-reading LoS which is like 700 pages, I’m going to be focusing on finishing Perks of Being a Wallflower next, and since it’s so short, hopefully, I’ll finish it in the next day or so. I have a December TBR coming out later this coming week so stay tuned for that to see what other books I want to pick up this month!

As for writing, a lot of writing got done this week and I am pretty proud. In terms of homework and school related things, this week was really slow so I was able to put a lot more effort into my own personal writing. I think overall, I wrote about 6,000 words which I haven’t done in a while. I’ve been re-writing old short stories and editing them like crazy to get ready for portfolio scholarship I am submitting to this Tuesday and if I had school work to do I don’t think I’d be able to get as much done as I did. I still have a lot to get done though so fingers crossed it all gets done.

That is all for this reading and writing update, and I hope you enjoyed! Don’t forget to check out my last blog post as well as my social media accounts which are all linked down below. Thanks 🙂

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