Biannual Bibliothon Day 6 – Reading By the Fire 101

alejtr5u

Happy day 6 of the Biannual Bibliothon!

Not going to lie…I completely forgot to write a reading update for day 3&4 but that’s okay because I didn’t get much done (hahaha go me). Anyways, today’s blog host is Jacqueline from EvilQueenBooksBlog and she wants us to tell her what books we think would be perfect fireside reads. This challenge sounds so cozy and it makes me want to curl up by the fire and read…even though I don’t have a fire to do that with. But anyway, I decided that along with picking 5 books to read, I would share some tips on how to have the perfect reading time next to a fire.

STEP ONE: Choose Your Books

gof

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by JK Rowling

I had to throw a Harry Potter book in here because are they not the most perfect side reads? The fourth book is my favourite as of right now in the series because it’s long and a little bit of a different plot structure than her other books. When I close my eyes, I can definitely imagine myself by the warm and crackling fire, swaddled in a blanket and cracking open this amazing book.

fangirl_coverdec2012

Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

Not only would this be a great fireside read because it always makes me feel all warm and fuzzy, but it is also one of those books I can finish in one sitting. This book is relatable, funny, adorable, awkward, and a whole lot of fun to read!

thelightbetweenourworlds1

The Light Between Worlds by Laura E. Weymouth

The atmosphere in this novel is cozy enough on its own that I wouldn’t even need a fire to read by. The story would do a well off job heating me up on a cold, cold day. This contemporary-fantasy book takes place in dreary ol’ London, the best place, I think personally, to cuddle up next to a fire. Well, actually right now in Canada a fire sounds great too but you get what I mean!

Image result for beneath the sugar sky

Beneath the Sugar Sky by Seanan McGuire

I have yet to read this book, which is the third installment in the Eleanor’s Home for Wayward Children series (will be reading it this readathon though!). I loved the first two books and cannot wait to dive into the next one. These books are so incredibly short (this one being under 150 pages),  and that along with their addictive, fast-paced storylines, makes them great fireside reads.

 

STEP TWO: Make Yummy Drinks/Snacks

This is a very important step. Are you going to make some delicious, rich hot chocolate? Steep some green tea or brew some coffee to keep you awake whilst reading? Maybe you’re a little hungry and need something to snack on. Well, now is the time to figure that all out! Personally, I would love nothing more than to snuggle up with a good book and some hot chocolate right now.

STEP THREE: Atmosphere

This is also crucial to your fireside reading experience. The atmosphere must be the ultimate cozy atmosphere, but how do you accomplish that? Well, let me tell you: blankets (specifically fuzzy ones, but any old blanket will do), mood lighting (if the fire isn’t enough light to read, light some candles or if your lights can adjust to different settings, perfect), and of course, seating (are you going to sit on the ground next to the fire, or on a chair? This is important to figure out people!).

STEP FOUR: READ

One important thing to remember while reading by fire is too NOT PUT YOUR BOOK IN THE FIRE. Whether it is intentional (for who knows what reason. Maybe the book is really bad) or accidental, books do not belong in fires. If you are a particularly clumsy person, adjust yourself so there is no way your book can accidentally fall out of your hands because let’s be honest, that would ruin step 3, and it’s all about the atmosphere.

Those are 4 books I would love to snuggle up and read by the fire, along with a “Reading By the Fire For Dummies” step-by-step guide! Don’t forget to check out my last blog post, as well as all my other Biannual Bibliothon blog challenges, and make sure you check out my social media accounts linked down below. Thanks for reading 🙂

Last Blog Post: 

Biannual Bibliothon Day 1 – Winter Snow Storm Fun

Biannual Bibliothon Day 2 – Christmas Party

Reading + Writing Update – Biannual Bibliothon 2019 Day 1 & 2

Biannual Bibliothon Day 3 – Bookish Mad Libs

Biannual Bibliothon Day 4 – Clickbait Challenge

Biannual Bibliothon Day 5 – Winter Trips

 

@zoermathers

 

Image result for instagram  @zoeiswriting

 

@zoematherswrites

The Light Between Worlds by Laura E. Weymouth – Book Review

 

On October 23rd, The Light Between Worlds by Laura E. Weymouth hit shelves and I am so excited for you to all read it! If you have heard absolutely nothing about this lovely book, I am going to be sharing my non-spoiler thoughts on this book and hopefully, by the end, you will want to pick it up too!


The Light Between Worlds is a YA magical realism story following three siblings who during the bombing of London in 1940, are somehow transported to a magical kingdom called the Woodlands. This is a place of nature and beauty, but the Woodlands is facing a battle of their own. The siblings vow to help them as much as they can in this war, but in return, ask to be sent home afterwards as if no time has passed at all.

Six years later, it is time for the siblings to finally go home and instantly, they are faced with a brand new battle of their very own. Their internal struggles as they try to adjust to life away from the Woodlands and back into a reality untouched by magic. It is easier for the two oldest siblings, Jamie and Philippa, but Evelyn struggles with making this world home again. When Evelyn disappears one day, Philippa must return to England after studying in America to unravel the mystery of her sister’s disappearance, and the struggles Evelyn faced while she was away.

This book is haunting and whimsical, transporting me into the world of the Woodlands and London post World War II. Despite reading it twice already, I easily found myself losing track of time while reading it, always finding myself pages ahead of where I originally thought. Taking place in 1940s-50s England, the atmosphere created was the definition of coziness; rainy, grey, and chilly. It was the perfect book to snuggle up with on a rainy day and some hot tea and just fall into for a few hours. This world really does take you by surprise with how vivid it is. I could see the trees of the forests standing tall in the Woodlands and the gardens outside the school Evelyn goes to when memories of the Woodlands attack her heart the most.

While this book has fantasy elements in it like the magic of the Woodlands, this book is less about the fantasy and more about finding yourself and coping in the meantime. Because of that, it is very character based, following the story and relationship of the two sisters, Evelyn and Philippa, both who are strong women but also have their own demons and ghosts to face. We learn how they both cope with them, and those are two very different ways that were not the healthiest. This made for a realistic aspect of the novel because often, people cannot find the best ways to cope with loss or the feeling of not belonging. Instead, they resort to other methods and that was a heavy theme woven into this book.

The other characters in this book played a big part in that theme of not always choosing the healthiest ways to cope which is a reality, especially in the modern world today, and listening to the truth beating in your heart and bones. Evelyn juggled with her emotions and thoughts this entire book, knowing she belonged in the Woodlands but sometimes, something, or someone, held her back from listening to that. But, it was never something the other person did knowingly, like Tom. Tom was the love interest for Evelyn and played an important role in this story. That role being the unveiling that sometimes a person’s problems cannot be solved by anyone other than that person themselves. A person is not a project; a jumbled mess of broken bits needed to be fixed, but an art piece that is slowly coming together on its own time.

Lately, mental illness has been something I’ve become more aware of and I noticed this book represented eating disorders and also depression. These were the reasons the characters had coping mechanisms, as one cannot leave a magical world and return to an ordinary one without fault. Nothing is graphic, but it is good to keep in mind when reading it in case you are easily triggered. On Laura E. Weymouth’s website, she goes into more detail about these triggers so make sure you check that out here.

Overall, this book was a cozy fantasy that I can definitely see myself picking for a third time in the future. I highly recommend it for fans of Narnia because it is very similar to that story-wise, however, different because Narnia is for younger readers while this novel is definitely for young adults. After debating it after my second read, I have decided to give The Light Between Worlds a 4.5/5 stars as it was a beautiful and gripping read that holds my interest every time.

Those are my non-spoiler thoughts on The Light Between Worlds by Laura E. Weymouth and I hope you enjoyed! Make sure to let me know if you decide to pick this book up and what your thoughts are on it! Also, don’t forget to check out my last blog post, as well as my social media accounts all linked down below. Thanks 🙂

Last Blog Post: 4 Books I Just Didn’t Like

 

@zoermathers

 

 

@zoeiswriting

 

 

@zoematherswrites