3 Tips for Upping Your Social Media Game

Happy Thursday!

Despite being completely free from the chains of high school and living days suddenly filled to the brim with free time (that I have not been using productively lately…), my social media game has still been wavering. Because of this, I thought it would be a good idea not only to share some tips on upping your social media game with you guys but with me as well since I clearly need some help too!

Anyways, I hope you find these helpful and that you enjoy 🙂

  1. Prep Content – Sometimes the day gets away from us and suddenly, any natural light is gone and your hope for taking a nice Instagram picture is gone…which is why you should prep pictures and content in advance! If I want to post to Instagram and I carve out around 20 minutes, I will take multiple pictures during that time instead. This saves you time and promotes consistency which leads to my next tip…
  2. Be Consistent! – Consistency in anything leads to success. If you have a blog, a YouTube channel, or any type of social media account, being consistent on these platforms is the easiest way to expand your following. Figure out what days you want to post on and make sure those posts are going up those days. While life is busy, I really recommend posting more than once a week. Personally, I want to try and post three to four times a week on my social media, and three times a week on my blog. This is what works best for me, and is the best way for me to make sure I stay consistent and active!
  3. Be Real – Nobody wants to follow someone who is fake. Be honest and real with the community on social media, and in time, you will grow and prosper! Sometimes, we don’t even realize we aren’t being fully ourselves because social media especially, forces people into a “perfect” mould that nobody is. Most people try to portray themselves as perfect, but that is not reality so make sure you are only portraying your authentic self!

Those are my three tips for upping your social media game, and I hope you enjoyed! Hopefully, in the next few weeks, my social media game will be back on track because I do love being able to connect with other writers and book lovers.

Anyways, don’t forget to check out my last blog post as well as my social media accounts which are all linked down below or available on the sidebar. Thanks for reading 🙂

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How I Plan + Write My Blog Posts

Happy Monday!

Currently, I am on a nine day long vacation visiting some family, but I pre-wrote these blogs posts so I don’t fall off the face of the earth…again. However, I thought this was a great opportunity to share you guys how I plan and write my blog posts. This is how I plan them whether I am going vacation or just figuring out my next line of content, but if you are thinking of starting a blog or want an insight to someone else’s routine, then this will be helpful!

I hope you enjoy!

PLANNING

Month by Month

Personally, I began planning out my blog content month by month. A few days before the end of each month, I will sit down and come up with at least most of my content for the entire month. It is super helpful if you are busy during the month and can’t always ensure you will have the time or energy to plan out your blog posts before they are scheduled to go up. Since I am starting my first year of university in around a month, this is what I’ve found is the easiest and most efficient way to make sure I am not neglecting my blog!

Have a Few “Staple” Blog Posts

By this, I mean have a few blog posts that you do almost every month. Whether these are reviews, TBRs, favourites, etc, etc, it is nice to have a few that you can fall back on when you are lacking creativity. A lot of the time, I will sit down at the end of each month and find that as I’m planning, I am slowly losing steam. When that happens, I just use my couple of staple blog posts so that there are days I’m not posting nothing even if it isn’t the most original idea.

Writing

Setting Aside Time

I post around 12-15 blog posts a month, so no way do I sit down and write them all for that month in ONE WHOLE DAY. Yeah, no. While I plan my blog posts out before the month even starts, that doesn’t mean I write them that ahead too. In fact, I usually write them the day before they are due to go up, or if I am feeling productive, I will write all three meant to go upcoming that week on Sunday.

This is just works best for me, and so far, has ensured that I don’t skip out on any blog days. If I know I have a busy week and will not be able to write anything for my blog, I will take a three hour chunk out of my Sunday to write them all up. To be honest, this is most likely what I will be doing once school starts although, the way I have it worked into my schedule as of now, is after my last class on Friday, I will work on writing up my blog content for Saturday, Monday, and Thursday of the coming week instead of Sunday. It is just what I think will work best, but we will see!

 

That is how I plan and I write blog posts, and I hope it was not only interesting, but helpful too! Don’t forget to check out my last blog post, as well as my social media accounts which are all linked down below. Thanks for reading 🙂

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How I Write Screenplays

Hello!

I thought it would be fun to share my writing process for screenplays, because I have noticed it’s a little different than my writing process for say, a short story or novel. This is definitely because when writing a screenplay, you should only be writing one because it is a story that has to be enjoyed on a screen, not on pages.

Here is my process and some helpful tips on how I write screenplays!

Part One – The Conflict

For me, the main conflict is what comes to me first, or is what I try to search for first. It has to be a conflict that once again, can only be acted out live rather than in words. It has to be complex and fleshed out enough in order for me to connect it with the right characters and the right plot line.

WHAT MAKES GOOD CONFLICT?

  • There’s a Reason for It – Sometimes, we have conflict that seems to arise from nowhere. Make sure there is a reason and cause for your conflict because otherwise, it won’t be believable.
  • It’s Interesting – This seems obvious, but it’s true! Make sure your conflict is entertaining and exciting otherwise with the rest of the story will fall flat. Ensure there are multiple sides to the conflict and ways it can go wrong that create tension for your story and characters.
  • It Can’t Be Solved in One Minute – A common problem related to conflict is having your conflict solved TOO easily. One character stabs the villain and then BOOM, it is over, done, sealed, solved. No, conflict should include a journey to solve and should have a believable solution when that finally occurs.

Part Two – The Rest of the Story

Before characters, I like to come up with the rest of the story because I like to fit the characters into it. Kind of like a puzzle.

I also use the three act structure like I do with my short stories and novels. It is a way of dividing up the story that works for me, because it doesn’t separate it too much.

Here is how I make use of each act:

Act I – The Beginning: introductions to characters + the world, introduced to conflict, goals are created

Act II – The Middle: goals are being sought after, story deepens, realizations occur, journey begins

Act III – The End: achievement of goals is in sight, story lines come together, a solution is made evident and is coming, tension

That is how I structure my act I, II, and III, and looking back, it looks a little all over the place, but hitting these key points within each act helps me create a fleshed out story.

Again, it is exactly how I structure my short stories and novels, but one thing I try to focus more on in my screenplays is action, action, action. What is happening that keeps up the story’s pace? How can I keep up tension, suspense, interest, etc? My goals while screenwriting is making sure things are happening and moving forward in a way that makes sense, and in a way that keeps people interested.

Part Three – The Characters

Now comes for another essential part to any story: the characters. Some people don’t like to do characters last, but I do because I like to figure out how my characters fit into the story, and how they contribute to it.

Questions to Ask Your Characters:

  • What is your goal? Is it the same as most of the characters, or different?
  • Are you trying to stop someone or something?
  • Are you trying to help someone or something?
  • Is there anything that would stop you from achieving your goal(s)?
  • What would help you achieve your goal(s)?

Again, very action related. What drives them? What stops them? Screenplays in my head are always go, go, go. You aren’t concerning yourself with too much exposition or fluff, it’s dialogue and action which is one thing I really do enjoy writing!

The formatting of screenplays is the only thing I don’t enjoy doing, which is why I use templates! You can Google a screenplay template, or if you have Scrivener, they have an awesome screenplay template on there which is what I used for my writing class last year.

Hopefully you got some good tips for writing a screenplay, especially if you never have attempted one before! I really recommend it because while I prefer short stories and novels, learning the process of writing a screenplay has definitely made me a better writer overall.

 

That is all for this blog post and I hope you enjoyed! Don’t forget to check out my last blog post as well as my social media accounts which are all linked down below. Thanks for reading 🙂

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How to: Get Out of a Reading Slump 2.0

Happy Thursday!

There are a lot of readathons happening in July so I thought it would be a good idea to share my tips and tricks on how to successfully free yourself from a reading slump.

  1. Pick Up an Old Favourite – My go-to remedy for a reading slump is to pick up an old favourite of mine that yes, I’ve read about 100 times, but love even more every time. For me, this is any Cassandra Clare book, Eliza and Her Monsters or Fangirl. I can read these books countless times and by the time I flip to the last page, they always have me wanting to consume more books.
  2. Don’t Force Yourself to Read – A lot of the time we fall into a reading slump because we are forcing ourselves to read when we don’t want to, or when it is a story we don’t want to read. NEVER force yourself to read (unless it’s for school because then you should probably just try to do it) because that only leads to getting no reading done at all.
  3. Let Yourself Be a Mood Reader – While I make TBRs for most months, they are created from books I really feel like reading at that moment. Luckily for me, if I feel like reading a book at the beginning of the month, I usually still will by mid-month but of course, this is not always the case. So, if you are in a slump or are edging towards one, take a look at your shelf and choose what you feel like reading. Forget your current read and your TBR. Just pick a book you want and read it.
  4. Watch Reading Vlogs – Whether I need some motivation to read or write or be productive, I love turning to vlogs for this. The act of watching someone else do what I want and need to do just fuels me with this sudden motivation to tackle whatever it is. Sometimes I have to watch the entire vlog, and sometimes another (but don’t get sucked into the vicious cycle of only watching these vlogs…try to limit yourself to 3 videos). Other times, I only need to watch the first few minutes and then I am good to go. Here is one of my favourites!
  5. Take a Trip to the Library or Book Store – I go to the library a LOT because it is only a 5-minute walk from my house. Even if I don’t pick out a book, sometimes it is helpful to just be surrounded by books. About 90% of the time, this makes me desperately want to pick up a book and spend the day indoors, absorbed in a new (or old) story.

Those are my 5 tips on how to wriggle free of a reading slump and I hope they were helpful! This month, I am participating in 2 readathons and in the next few days, I will have my TBRs up for them. Also, I will now be posting on Saturdays as well so look out for those new blog posts! Thanks for reading 🙂

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How To: Write + COMPLETELY Edit a Short Story In ONE Week

Happy Friday! (Just kidding. I decided to post this a day early so happy THURSDAY!)

This past week, I have been writing like a madwoman because as always, I put things off to the last moment. This “thing” I put off was a writing scholarship portfolio that is due actually today when you are reading this, so fingers crossed, the submission process for future Zoe went well.

Anyways, I always do things last minute, especially writing things, so I thought I would give some of my tips for fast-drafting and polishing up a short story in a short time span. Also, apparently May is short story month so this is the perfect time to share this blog post with you all. Hopefully, you all find this helpful and if you have any tips of your own, make sure you leave them down below!

  1. Outline, Outline, Outline – Even if you aren’t a huge fan of outlining (like myself), I highly, HIGHLY recommend writing out an outline before fast-drafting. Even if it is only a sentence of what happens in the beginning, middle, and end, then that is better than nothing and will help you so much while drafting. This will save you from those moments where you pause your writing sprint because you have no idea where you are going with this story.
  2. Do More Than One Draft – When it comes to short stories, I will try to do a draft a day. Especially if I have at least one week before it needs to be finished and ready to go. If I am even shorter on time, I’ll write draft one in the morning, draft two in the evening and so on. Personally, I like to write at least three drafts. Sometimes more if I think the story desperately needs it, but usually at three I decide it is a good time to let it sit for a moment before diving into edits.
  3. Start With the BIG Edits – Honestly, I do not know the “right” or “proper” way to edit. I do what works best for me which is making the huge changes first. This means cutting chunks out, re-writing sections, and adjusting dialogue and character descriptions. Also, just overall trying to get to my word count goal. I personally don’t see the point in starting with the little edits because I end up slicing up my drafts and barely any of the words survive to see the next day!
  4. Now For the Little Edits – Now, after glossing up your story and finally, FINALLY getting it to your desired word count, it is time to focus on the smaller, yet very important things. This is things like grammar, italicizing words, fixing word order, etc, etc. The little things that make the sentences flow nicely and make them sound beautiful.
  5. Let It Sit – If you have the time to spare, let your story sit for at LEAST one day. If you can afford to give it more, than great. Usually, I only have one day. So, I will give my story that one day and then usually the day it’s due (yes, I know, I’m SO on top of things), I will give it a final tweaking. No big edits though because that could start a total disaster.

Those are my 5 tips for writing short stories while under tight deadlines and I hope they were helpful! Don’t forget to check out my last blog post as well as my social media accounts which are all linked down below. Thanks for reading 🙂

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How To: Read for English Class

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This year, I’ve learned a LOT about reading from my English class (it’s a 12th grade and first-year university English class put together), and I wanted to share all the tips I’ve gathered with all of you today! Anyways, here are a few simple but effective tips for getting the most out of each book you read for English, both for your class and personally.

Tip #1: Read As Many of Your Required Readings As Possible

If you have the time, read as many books on your required reading as possible. This is a little easier to do in university since they give you a syllabus, but some high school teachers will tell you what you’re reading each year. If not, it is actually pretty easy to guess what you’re going to read. For example, I knew I was going to read Hamlet this year because that’s what I’ve been told since grade 9. Anyways, it will save you a lot of stress so instead of cramming to finish a book for class in only like a week, you’ll already have an idea about it and only need to skim. Since I’m starting the first year of my English degree next year (if I get in but I’m being hopeful), I searched up as many syllabuses for them as I could find, and found that I will be reading Frankenstein, The Tempest (which, I’ve already read), and a few others that I plan on attempting to read this summer just to make life a little easier next year.

Tip #2: Annotate!

Whether you want to write in the book (make sure it’s your own) or use stickies to keep track of important things, annotating will be your key to success when writing papers. Whether you know the topic of your paper that’s in response to the book you’re reading or not, sticky the important things like turns in the plot, quotes that contribute to the theme, mood, character, etc, and anything that hints at the overall theme of the story. If you have a notebook you want to write out your annotations in, that will be really helpful too!

Tip #3: Read Scholarly Essays 

I’ve been reading a lot of Greek tragedies lately, and I ended up also picking up this book called Oxford Readings in Greek Tragedy, and it has been really helpful when it comes to analyzing and understanding each play. I picked up this book because I plan on doing a few Greek and Roman classes, one of them being Greek Tragedy so I’m just preparing for the future. There are a lot of amazing scholarly essays online that you can read and it helps you to form your own opinion on whatever you are reading by comparing it with others, so I highly recommend checking some out!

Tip #4: Think About Theme

One thing my teacher told me about when it comes to reading as an English student, is that there are three levels of a reader: 1) The beginning reader who focuses and then writes about obvious things like plot and character 2) The experienced reader focuses and then writes about things like mood and irony 3) And the advanced reader focuses and then writes about narrative point of view and theme. This is really important to keep in mind and I hope it adjusts how you approach your reading!

Those are my 4 main tips on how to read like an English student, and I hope they were helpful! Let me know any tips you have when it comes to being an English student because I’m always looking for more ways to improve my reading and writing. Anyways, don’t forget to check out my last blog post as well as my social media accounts which are linked down below. Thanks for reading 🙂

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Biannual Bibliothon Day 6 – Reading By the Fire 101

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Happy day 6 of the Biannual Bibliothon!

Not going to lie…I completely forgot to write a reading update for day 3&4 but that’s okay because I didn’t get much done (hahaha go me). Anyways, today’s blog host is Jacqueline from EvilQueenBooksBlog and she wants us to tell her what books we think would be perfect fireside reads. This challenge sounds so cozy and it makes me want to curl up by the fire and read…even though I don’t have a fire to do that with. But anyway, I decided that along with picking 5 books to read, I would share some tips on how to have the perfect reading time next to a fire.

STEP ONE: Choose Your Books

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Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by JK Rowling

I had to throw a Harry Potter book in here because are they not the most perfect side reads? The fourth book is my favourite as of right now in the series because it’s long and a little bit of a different plot structure than her other books. When I close my eyes, I can definitely imagine myself by the warm and crackling fire, swaddled in a blanket and cracking open this amazing book.

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Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

Not only would this be a great fireside read because it always makes me feel all warm and fuzzy, but it is also one of those books I can finish in one sitting. This book is relatable, funny, adorable, awkward, and a whole lot of fun to read!

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The Light Between Worlds by Laura E. Weymouth

The atmosphere in this novel is cozy enough on its own that I wouldn’t even need a fire to read by. The story would do a well off job heating me up on a cold, cold day. This contemporary-fantasy book takes place in dreary ol’ London, the best place, I think personally, to cuddle up next to a fire. Well, actually right now in Canada a fire sounds great too but you get what I mean!

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Beneath the Sugar Sky by Seanan McGuire

I have yet to read this book, which is the third installment in the Eleanor’s Home for Wayward Children series (will be reading it this readathon though!). I loved the first two books and cannot wait to dive into the next one. These books are so incredibly short (this one being under 150 pages),  and that along with their addictive, fast-paced storylines, makes them great fireside reads.

 

STEP TWO: Make Yummy Drinks/Snacks

This is a very important step. Are you going to make some delicious, rich hot chocolate? Steep some green tea or brew some coffee to keep you awake whilst reading? Maybe you’re a little hungry and need something to snack on. Well, now is the time to figure that all out! Personally, I would love nothing more than to snuggle up with a good book and some hot chocolate right now.

STEP THREE: Atmosphere

This is also crucial to your fireside reading experience. The atmosphere must be the ultimate cozy atmosphere, but how do you accomplish that? Well, let me tell you: blankets (specifically fuzzy ones, but any old blanket will do), mood lighting (if the fire isn’t enough light to read, light some candles or if your lights can adjust to different settings, perfect), and of course, seating (are you going to sit on the ground next to the fire, or on a chair? This is important to figure out people!).

STEP FOUR: READ

One important thing to remember while reading by fire is too NOT PUT YOUR BOOK IN THE FIRE. Whether it is intentional (for who knows what reason. Maybe the book is really bad) or accidental, books do not belong in fires. If you are a particularly clumsy person, adjust yourself so there is no way your book can accidentally fall out of your hands because let’s be honest, that would ruin step 3, and it’s all about the atmosphere.

Those are 4 books I would love to snuggle up and read by the fire, along with a “Reading By the Fire For Dummies” step-by-step guide! Don’t forget to check out my last blog post, as well as all my other Biannual Bibliothon blog challenges, and make sure you check out my social media accounts linked down below. Thanks for reading 🙂

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Biannual Bibliothon Day 1 – Winter Snow Storm Fun

Biannual Bibliothon Day 2 – Christmas Party

Reading + Writing Update – Biannual Bibliothon 2019 Day 1 & 2

Biannual Bibliothon Day 3 – Bookish Mad Libs

Biannual Bibliothon Day 4 – Clickbait Challenge

Biannual Bibliothon Day 5 – Winter Trips

 

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How To Write Awesome Characters

Happy Friday!

I hope the New Year is treating you well so far, and to help celebrate it, I am going to be sharing a few of my tips on how to write awesome characters that you and your readers will love. If you have any other tips leave in the comments below and let’s help each other! Anyways, let’s get into it.

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  1. Make Them Passionate About Something – Funnily enough, this tip was reminded to me through reading Wintersong by S. Jae-Jones, a book I didn’t really love. However, I did admire how passionate the main character was about music and composing, and it reminded me that passion for something is a strong ingredient in anyone, even characters. Think about it, when you are making friends, you always ask what kind of things they enjoy doing. When that person is really interested in one, two, or even a few things and beam when they talk about those things, you feel like you understand that person more thus making it easier to become friends. It is the same with characters, if you make them intensely passionate about at least one thing, there is a chance that some of your readers have the same passion but if they don’t, at least you readers will admire reading about a character who despite the plot, is passionate about something they love. Make sense? Passion adds depth and depth creates awesome characters.
  2. Ensure They Are Neither Truly Good or Bad – One thing I hate reading about is an entirely good main character because it’s not realistic! None of us are perfect. We can be mostly good but we will still make bad decisions. To combat this problem, create a realistic and interesting character by addressing that they aren’t always good or bad through their actions. It is the same with pure evil characters. Sure, if they are the antagonist I don’t mind having one that is like 99.9% evil. However, it is even BETTER when they aren’t purely evil but have some good mixed in there. It makes the villain so much more than just the villain, thus creating an awesome character.
  3. Focus On Their Interactions – I have read so many books where our main character is speaking to their best friend or sibling or boyfriend/girlfriend, but it sounds SO formal. This always throws me out of the story a bit because suddenly, my ability to believe this story as reality fades. It is so important to focus on first, who your character is and from then, go onto how they interact with those around them. Figure out how they would speak to their parents, best friend, brother, sister, grandparents, friends, strangers, villains, etc, etc. It will bring your characters and story to life.
  4. Watch Avatar: The Last Airbender – This TV show is AMAZING when it comes to sharing character backstory, personality, motives, etc…basically anything about the character is revealed in genius ways throughout the 3 seasons of this TV show. Honestly, watch it for fun because this is one of my favourite shows ever, but also analyze how the creators make awesome characters. Watch how they develop each individual storyline and make it fit seamlessly together with other characters…just watch it. Now.

Those are my 4 main tips to creating awesome characters and I hope that this was helpful to you, especially in the new year when new stories are being created and old ones are being revised. Double check your characters tick of these boxes and you are one step closer to great, 3D characters. Anyways, don’t forget to check out my last blog post, as well as my social media accounts which are linked down below. Thanks for reading 🙂

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How To: Take a Break From Writing

I really wanted to make this blog post on how to take a PROPER and BENEFICIAL break from writing because I actually plan on taking a whole month off of writing. I will explain this a bit more at the end of this post because first I am going to be sharing some tips and tricks to get the most out of a writing break!

Q: Should I Take a Writing Break?

I think it is essential to take a writing break from time to time. Whether that is only a week or a month, taking some time to just chill and rejuvenate your creativity is crucial to your writing as well as your mental and physical well-being. So yes, if you feel yourself on the verge of breaking from the stress of writing, or if you are well past that point, keep reading this because it is time to take a break! Breaks from writing will also give you a chance to focus your time and energy on other things like reading, school work, exercise, or spending time with friends or family. Things that you might have been neglecting before.

Q: Will Taking a Writing Break Make Me a Bad Writer?

No! Taking time away from writing can sometimes install guilt because we writers have this idea that we need to always be writing, and if we don’t, we are a failure. This is not true and here is your daily reminder of it! Taking time will if anything, only make you a BETTER writer. Breaks are important because they prevent burnout which is really unhealthy so take that break.

How To Get the Most Out of Your Break:

  • Read…a LOT – This is a great way to fill your depleted creative well with good stories, that way, you will be topped off and ready to write when your break is over. Some books I recommend reading during your break are Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert, Eat Pray Love by Elizabeth Gilbert, and On Writing by Stephen King.
  • Watch movies/TV Shows…a LOT – This is like reading, this refuels you with good stories and also gives your mind a break from thinking, creating, etc. Something that everyone needs.
  • Pick Up a New Hobby – One way to help your creativity/writing is to try something new and totally unrelated to writing. Start baking or knitting or exercising. Something that will keep you occupied from the guilt of not writing and that you really enjoy.
  • Focus Your Energy On Neglected Activities – Whether it is time to make more time for your friends and family, or spend more time outside, focus this new found time and energy into things you might have been neglecting lately.
  • Journal – This is still writing, but this is a type of writing that doesn’t require any outlining or thought really. Journalling is a great way to just let go of everything bottled up inside of you and I recommend it even when you’re not on a writing break.
  • Sleep More – Sometimes I go late into the night writing, but while I’m on writing breaks I try to make it a priority to go to sleep earlier and then wake up early. It’s important to get no less than 7 hours of sleep, but maybe without writing, you can clock in 8 or 9 hours. Personally, sleeping more than 8 hours gives me a headache because my body feels like it has overslept, but it’s nice to be able to wake up early and just lay in bed for longer.

Why I’m Taking a Writing Break…

I wanted to write this blog post because yes, I have decided to go on a writing break. Not only do I feel depleted creatively, but I really want to spend more time focused on reading and school work. I am in my senior year of high school and am also taking a university class (Writing 100), and lately, have felt like I’ve been neglecting school which isn’t good! I want to focus my energy on my school work to end my high school career on a strong note. Of course, I also want to do well in my uni course because I do get credits for it and can use it towards what I am studying next year obviously. There is no set timeline for this writing break but I am starting it this week and basically am going with the flow and ending it whenever. However, saying that, I don’t want it to extend any further than the end of January. Of course, I will still have assignments for my writing class to do and essays for classes and scholarships to write, but my break is more geared towards taking a break from my own personal, creative writing. I’ve put a lot into my own writing these last few months and just really, really need a little breather. But yes, this may be a one and a half month break but we will see. I encourage you to also take a break if you are feeling a little stuck or tired because it might be for the best!

Anyways, that is all for this blog post and I hope you enjoyed! Don’t forget to check out my last blog post as well as my social media accounts linked down below. Thanks for reading 🙂

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3 Tips to Reach Your 2018 Reading Goals

We only have 19 days left of 2018 and I don’t know about you, but I still have 10 books I need to read before I hit my 75 book reading goal. By following these 3 tips to achieving my reading goals in a short amount of time, I know I can get it done and you can too! It’s important to remember that reading is not about reading X amount of books every year or reading JUST to reach that amount of books, but I do think it’s fun to set goals for yourself and stick to them. Reading always be fun and never a chore, but anyways, here are my 3 tips!

1. Audiobooks, Audiobooks, Audiobooks

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Audiobooks will be your golden key to hitting your reading goal in just a matter of a few weeks. You can listen to them when you are doing mindless tasks around the house like cleaning, making lists, or even getting ready in the morning. They are also great to listen to when you are commuting to work or school. For example, I listen to them when I’m walking to school or taking the bus and currently, I’m listening to City of Lost Souls by Cassandra Clare. You can get audiobooks on Audible (but they cost quite a bit of money), but I prefer using Overdrive or other online library apps that allow me to use my local library card code to borrow free ones via my phone. Overdrive is a great one so I recommend checking it out!

2. Under 200 Pages? Awesome!

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Short books are also a great way to get a lot of reading done in a miniscule amount of time because if you sit down and read 50 pages, that is already a good chunk of the way through the book. Currently, I’m reading Queen of Air and Darkness by Cassandra Clare which is no small book by any means (it’s 912 pages), but I balance it out with shorter books like the Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky (which I’m also reading right now and is just over 200 pages). Other short books you should check out are The Outsider by Albert Camus (115 pages), We Were Liars by E. Lockhart (227 pages), Kissing Frogs by Alisha Sevigny (182 pages) and Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli (186 pages).

3. Balance Multiple Books at Once

Honestly, whether you are a student right now or not, this should be something you are familiar with. With my classes, I’m usually reading if not one, then two books at the same time along with whatever I read in my own time. Balancing multiple books at once is a really useful skill and also helpful when it comes to reading lots of books every year. If you have a really hard time separating the books you are reading or remembering what the hell is happening in each of your books, then give it a try anyway because you might get the hang of it. I can’t not read multiple books at once because I’ve gotten so used to it and I have also gotten really good at it!

Those are my 3 tips to help you hit your reading goal before the end of the year, and I hope you enjoyed! Don’t forget to check out my last blog post, as well as my social media accounts which are linked down below. Thanks for reading 🙂

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